Flying North  (2019)  mixed-media installation - tape, wire and string, paint on board.  Inspired by the relationship between those who fled southern plantations and the migrating birds they followed north to freedom,  Flying North  memorializes Black underground resistance to Slavery between 17th-19th century New York. A hanging mobile depicting birds in flight, the V-formation of birds points in the northwards direction.  Flying North  reminds viewers of the ways that black liberatory histories have been entangled with non-human species in supportive ecological relationships. A map envisions a series of these mobiles to hang from the ceilings of various New York spaces which have served important stations of the Underground Railroad - their dangling presence would mark sites of Black liberatory action.

Flying North (2019) mixed-media installation - tape, wire and string, paint on board.

Inspired by the relationship between those who fled southern plantations and the migrating birds they followed north to freedom, Flying North memorializes Black underground resistance to Slavery between 17th-19th century New York. A hanging mobile depicting birds in flight, the V-formation of birds points in the northwards direction. Flying North reminds viewers of the ways that black liberatory histories have been entangled with non-human species in supportive ecological relationships. A map envisions a series of these mobiles to hang from the ceilings of various New York spaces which have served important stations of the Underground Railroad - their dangling presence would mark sites of Black liberatory action.

Oikos (2017) Mixed-Media Installation - glass brick, plants, paint on ceramic lamp, paint on ink-jet print, glass sheets

Ernst Haeckel’s oekologie (ecology) is the “relation of the animal both to its organic as well as its inorganic environment.” The word comes from the Greek oikos, meaning “household,” “home,” or “place to live.” Oikos (2017) developed from a series of portraiture sessions in the artist’s home. Layers of light, organics and non-organic materials were projected, pressed, painted on to the body, exploring the shape of black queer ecologies.

The installation accompanied a month of art and cultural programming at the Queen's Museum as part of the “Set On Freedom” series, curated by Lee Bullitt, Tiffany Joy Butler, Jes Fan, Ayasha Guerin, and Sue Jeong Ka. One year following the inaugural SoF retreat, the works presented in this exhibition and accompanying program series, Set on Freedom, were created during the artists’ work to foster an inclusionary and mutually-supportive artistic community. Acting as self-disciplined cultural organizers during this process, the exhibiting artists explored their own representations of race, gender, sexuality, and love, de-centering whiteness and imagining radical systems of progress to uplift themselves as queer artists of color.

A Sudden Change in Course (2012) Mixed-media installation - fabric, wire, painted gold leaves, inkjet prints, vegetables, seaweed, rice, paper plates.

The alluvial history of the Mississippi river hangs from ceiling to floor. Drawn from a 1930’s Army Corps of Engineer’s survey map, each color represents a different century of the river’s natural meander, while the gold leaves reference the value of its flowing sediments. This history is hung before a gridded image of a flooded New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, a photograph taken from an Army Corps of Engineer helicopter. On the other side of the wall, a lecture-performance: the rolling of vegetable maki rolls for each attendant. In the time it took to roll, they were explained the history of Mississippi flood control and its disastrous effects on the populations who live on (and in) the river. When attendees were finished with their food-for-thought, they were invited to hang their plates around a framed image of the endangered Mississippi salmon.